Posted in Motorcycle, women in motorcycling, Women Riders

Inspiring Women Work in the Motorcycling Industry

Words by Julie Nordskog Andrews

Reprint with permission from Ride Texas magazine (Winter 2021 issue).

Posted in Profile, women in motorcycling

Black Girls Ride: Porsche Taylor Leads Diversity in Motorcycling for Black Women Riders (excerpt with permission)

Words by Julie Nordskog Andrews

Photo by Lily Snodagrass.

Porsche Taylor is a leading figure in powersports whose journey helped catalyze
the growth of women riders in the motorcycling community. Over the past decade, she drove broader acceptance and respect for women in the industry by manifesting greater representation for women of color, debunking stereotypes, and supporting women riders in general.

And she’s 100 percent genuine. I’ve been in the same place at women’s motorcycling events at the same time as she twice in recent years. Open and friendly, she’s almost soft-spoken. Want a selfie with Porsche? Just ask. Her grin is as infectious as her love of riding.

Porsche was born in Hawaii and grew up in Southern California. Like many women, Porsche was introduced to motorcycle riding by a male family member. Her cousin
bought a bike in 2003 and invited her to ride as a passenger. While she discovered she loved riding, Porsche explains, she didn’t necessarily like the way her cousin rode the motorcycle.

Then she had an epiphany. “It sounds silly,” says Porsche. “but it really was watching the movie Biker Boyz that inspired me to ride my own motorcycle. There were black women riding. That let me know that this is something I can do. It was that ‘representation matters’ moment.” She bought a red 1997 Kawasaki Ninja and found a woman rider to mentor her at a bike night in Hollywood.

Porsche came to know many black women riders of all styles, including racers, stunt riders, and tourers. Still, for years, she didn’t see women of color represented much, if at all, in the media or motorsports advertising. She decided to be the change she wished to see….


Read the entire article in the Summer 2021 issue of Ride Texas magazine.

Posted in Article, fundraising, women in motorcycling

Moto-Charity is Everywhere: Women Motorcyclists Lead Altruistic Efforts Locally and Nationwide (excerpt with permission)

Words by Julie Nordskog Andrews

Kirsten Midura addresses Engines For Change volunteers for the Ride Against Hunger.
Photo by Peter Domorak.

On Christmas Eve 2006, Louise Lewis was volunteering in a hospital children’s ward when a group of “biker dudes” arrived on a toy run to the young patients’ excitement. She, too, was excited and impressed by the contradiction between the bikers’ gruff image and soft hearts. A “cager” (car driver) herself, Louise set out to ask this question of motorcyclists from all backgrounds: What is the meaning of life? Thirteen years later, the result was The Meaning of Life According to Bikers: The Biker Book for Charity.

The “Biker Book” is literally a book for charity. It is not a directory or description of charitable acts, but a collection of motorcyclists’ takes on the meaning of life. Louise donates all sales proceeds as she works toward her goal to give to all 250 U.S. children’s hospitals. To do so, she buys books from the publisher to take on tour. She pays expenses from her own pocket. Still, the book’s full sales price goes to charity.

“I’m working for the kids,” says Louise. “That’s my mission.” If you missed her Texas tour last May, you can help Louise help the kids by going to the website (bikerbookforcharity.com) and clicking on “Order a Signed Copy.”

Not surprisingly, motorcycling women coordinate and lead many toy runs and other motorcycle related charitable project or fundraisers throughout the year….


Also featured in this article:


Read the full article in the Fall 2021 issue of Ride Texas magazine.

Posted in Hoka Hey Challenge, Motorcycle, Women Riders

Women of the Hoka Hey Motorcycle Challenge

Are YOU up to the challenge?
It’s a good day to ride.

By my count, a total of 14 women have completed the 10,000-mile Hoka Hey Motorcycle Challenge (HHMC)– ever.* Four of these women have completed two or more challenges.

To give an idea of the magnitude of the accomplishment,  949 riders in all have made the attempt. Hoka Hey hosted challenge rides in 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2016 and 2018.  A rough sketch of the playing field over time  shows: approximately 100 riders participate per challenge, and, although results vary from year to year, about one-third successfully complete the ride as “Finishers.”

To qualify as a Hoka Hey Finisher, a rider must follow a set of written directions provided at each checkpoint (about 2,500 miles apart) without the aid of GPS. The route is different every year, and riders do not know in advance where they will go. If the rider deviates from instructions, she must return to the point where she got off-route and begin again. In addition, riders must sleep outside next to their motorcycles for the duration. The total ride is approximately 10,000 miles.

The 2018 challenge began with 13 women riders, representing the largest number of women riders to enter a Hoka Hey Challenge. Seven women successfully crossed the finish line, and, of these, five were first-time riders. I was fortunate and honored to be counted among them.

Finally, the Hoka Hey is not a race. It is about finishing, no matter how long it takes. How long did it take? Well, as one of the last to cross the finish line, it took me 21 days. The fastest to finish the route did so in 10 days (with little to no sleep, I might add). But a fair average for time to complete the 10,000-mile route would fall in the range of 14 to 16 days.

Here’s a bit of wonky math: if 350 riders in total (give or take) have completed the Hoka Hey at least once, then women represent 4% of those finishers. And that is elite company.

The full list of past challenge participants and finishers is available on the Hoka Hey Challenge website. The next Hoka Hey Motorcycle Challenge will take place in 2020.

—–

*Note: These are my observations and estimates only based on the information available. The are not official Hoka Hey Challenge numbers. Rider statistics were not recorded for the inaugural ride in 2010.

Posted in Motorcycle, safety, Women Riders

Riding in the Driving Rain

I recently shared the following in response to an Instagram post from @empoweringwomenriders (#followthosegals).

blurry rain
When this is the view from your visor. : /

Sometimes you have somewhere to be with no ifs, ands, or buts. In those times, when you find you absolutely have to ride your motorcycle in the driving rain (pun intended), take extra precautions.

  • Trust your gut. If it looks like rain ahead, then stop and put on all the gear before you get dumped on. Because soggy boots suck.
  • Slow way down. It absolutely does not matter how fast the cars are going. Just get in the slow lane, if there is one, and/or throw on your flashers (and leave them on) and wave the cars past.
  • Increase your safety distance by a lot and don’t let anyone tailgate you. (See previous tip.)
  • Ride in cars’ tire tracks if possible.
  • Never trust a puddle.
  • Do not slam on the brakes.
  • Rough weather can stress you out and wear you down. Take a coffee break. You deserve it.

These are only a few pointers from my experience. Here are more detailed articles on the topic:

https://www.twistedthrottle.com/blog/15-tips-for-motorcycle-riding-in-the-rain/

https://motoress.com/ride/how-to/tips-for-motorcycle-riding-in-heavy-rain/

https://www.visordown.com/features/advanced-riding/wet-weather-motorcycle-riding-tips

While not rain-specific, I want to stress the evermore critical nature of protection in the rain: wear all the gear, all the time. #atgatt #helmet #nobrainer

A closing point: rain gear and weatherproof gear can differ significantly. What you wear and/or wish to carry on your bike will depend on your needs. Read this gear guide for product specifications:

https://www.denniskirk.com/learn/motorcycle-rain-gear-guide

What experiences have you had riding in the rain? Which tips would you add to the list? 🏍🖤

 

@twistedthrottle @motoress @visordown @gearpatrol @klimwomen @denniskirk

Posted in End Hunger, Feeding America, fundraising, Hoka Hey Challenge

Meals for Miles: Meeting and Beating the Challenge

Final Tally: 20,000 Meals!

woman wearing silver diamond ring biting green apple

September is Hunger Action Month.  Find Your Local Food Bank and Donate Today!

From July 16 through August 6, 2018, I participated in the Hoka Hey Motorcycle Challenge, a 10,000-mile ride winding throughout the U.S. As part of this endeavor, I launched a social media campaign not only to participate in the ride, but also to raise funds to provide 10,000 meals with Feeding America.  The campaign tagline was “10,000 meals for 10,000 miles.”

I’m proud to say we doubled our initial goal. Funds raised by the “Hoka Hey Y’all” campaign will provide hungry families with 20,000 meals.

How were we able to achieve this? I say “we” because more than 70 individuals contributed to the campaign– and some donated multiple times. I cannot thank everyone enough!

First, I researched non-profit organizations to identify one that could best leverage our donation dollars. I learned of Feeding America, a national, non-profit organization with top-ratings from Charity Navigator. Ninety-eight percent of donations to Feeding America goes to programs. This level of efficiency is exceptional in the non-profit world. Furthermore, Feeding America can produce 10 meals for every dollar donated.

I then scoured the Feeding America website to determine the various ways to donate funds and otherwise support their cause. There I discovered a matching grant from a Feeding America partner (Tony Robbins) that will give the organization an additional dollar for every dollar donated. By leveraging this matching grant, each of our donated dollars will now produce 20 meals. Wow!

Finally, I sought to maximize participation in the fundraising campaign by using multiple online platforms. These were: Facebook, GoGetFunding, and Instagram. I was careful to research these platforms to incur the least amount of fees possible. I encourage everyone to do his or her own research on fundraising platforms at any given time, as terms may change.

No matter how one slices it, the recipient of electronic funds transfers will pay  fees.  Payment processing fees are rolled into the percentage a given fundraising platform will retain for its services. The use of a platform does facilitate and lend legitimacy to online fundraising campaigns. At the same time, it is important to know just how much in flat fees and/or percentages will be retained for platform services and to calculate whether these deductions are justifiable fundraising costs.  Some platforms may retain as much as 15 percent of funds received. My goal was to keep costs below five percent.

On the back end, I established a dedicated PayPal account to receive funds for fundraising sales of #Badass patches and from individuals requesting to donate directly, while still paying applicable fees. PayPal processing fees are presently 0.29 percent plus $0.30 per transaction. Finally, I opened a dedicated bank account to accept and easily track fund transfers. I made sure this online bank account was free of charge. In short, I wanted to keep the gap between gross donations (before costs) and net donations (after costs) to a minimum.

Of the platforms used, Facebook provided me with the broadest reach, in large part because I had an established network of followers and group memberships. Some of my posts were about the fundraiser and others strictly about the Motorcycle Challenge, but all created branding and name recognition surrounding the campaign.

Other recommended best practices for social media fundraising include: 

  1. Be specific about what you what you need and exactly what donations will pay for. I published a simple itemized budget as part of the fundraiser description.
  2. Put a face to your campaign. Whether this is your face or the face of a beneficiary, people want to support people.
  3. Know your audience! Identify group(s) of people with similar interests and values. Join and participate in their groups (without self-promotion) to learn more. And don’t be afraid to reach out to individuals.
  4. Post frequent updates about your progress with donations received and what remains to reach your goal. This includes making repeated “asks.” Sometimes all people need is a reminder and/or to see that others are supporting the campaign.
  5. Educate people about your cause. Let them know what impact they will have and just whom they will be helping by pitching in.

Finally, a contributing factor to the success of this fundraiser was the modest request for donation dollars: $20, $5, $1. My message was that every single dollar counted and was deeply appreciated. After all, one dollar would provide 20 meals! Any contribution was significant, and this made giving do-able for individual donors.

If you have additional tips or questions about online fundraising, please share them!

 

 

 

 

Posted in Badass, End Hunger, Feeding America, Fundraiser, Hoka Hey Challenge, Motorcycle, Women Riders

1 BADASS patch = 100 Meals

watch me

 ***10,000 Meals for 10,000 Miles*** campaign. All July BADASS patch sales go to Julie’s Hoka Hey fund for donation to #FeedingAmerica.

Buy one $5.50 patch, feed 100 people!

Get Your BADASS Patch Today: https://facebook.com/commerce/products/1730103200438091

FREE SHIPPING with Discount Code HOKA HEY.

With @FeedingAmerica, and a matching partner grant, just $1 will provide 20 meals to hungry families this summer.

THANK YOU for making this all possible. #BeTheChange #EndHungerInAmerica

Badass Porkchop

Posted in Hoka Hey Challenge, Motorcycle, Sponsors

Hoka Hey Ready

tabooharley-logo

I’m packed and ready for the 10k-mile Hoka Hey. The ride starts July 15th from Medicine Park, OK. I am Rider #942. If you want to follow the ride, I will post a link to the tracker on my bike before we start.

My Hoka Hey sponsor @tabooharley Taboo HD in Alexandria, LA gave my bike a full tune-up, new rear brakes, new tires. And fixed a cylinder oil leak (thankfully still under warranty). Overnight. Love these guys and gals!!!

It always seems to rain on the ride home from Louisiana to Texas. Oh, well. You know what they say, “If you don’t ride in the rain, you don’t ride.” I’m ready! Dry bags, rain gear, latex gloves, tarp, umbrella. Yup,  umbrella.